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cold water & ice swimming (IISA)

A very good video on Hypothermia > too long in water that is too cold

This is presented by The South End Rowing Club in San Francisco - where the water never really gets warm.

A few comments:

De 13 positieve effecten van kou op je lichaam

(Soest - 2020-01-27) Recent stond er in de krant dat het heel gezond kan zijn om jezelf regelmatig bloot te stellen aan lage temperaturen. Wouter van Marken Lichtenbelt, hoogleraar aan de Universiteit van Maastricht, raadt aan om regelmatig de kou op te zoeken. Volgens hem is het niet nodig om altijd een dikke sjaal en muts te dragen.

De laatste jaren zijn er in de medische literatuur steeds meer studies te vinden naar de gezondheidsvoordelen van regelmatige blootstelling aan koude temperaturen. Wim Hof, die internationaal bekend staat als ‘The Iceman’, is al lange tijd bekend met de kracht van kou. De Nederlander heeft dan ook vele kouderecords op zijn naam staan. Ook werkte hij mee aan verschillende wetenschappelijke onderzoeken. Daarbij is vastgesteld dat wij bewust ons zenuwstelsel en immuunsysteem kunnen beïnvloeden (1, 2). Meditatie en ademhaling zijn daarbij belangrijke factoren. De kracht van meditatie en ademhaling is zo groot, dat kou minder vat krijgt op lichaam en geest. Blootstelling aan kou kan de geest scherpen en trainen, maar er zijn ook vele voordelen voor het fysieke lichaam.

Neoprene and afterdrop: how to keep swimming outside this winter

With a reported 323% rise in people swimming outdoors, here is the expert guide to ensuring you take the plunge safely – even when temperatures plummet

When lockdown rules eased in May, a friend and I went for a surreptitious dip in a nearby lake. It was exactly what we needed. The shock of cold water provided the thrills, while merging into the landscape brought the bliss. Afterwards, we floated through the woods on a post-swim high. “Shall we do it again next week?” we said.

Cold water swimming advice from an Ice Mile expert

In a few weeks, Outdoor Swimmer's very own English channel soloist and ice kilometre challenger, Joanne, will be heading to Cheltenham to swim what she hopes will be her first ice kilometre swim at the Great British IISA Championships. She’s been chatting with Kate Steels throughout the winter and recently visited her at Andark lake.

Kate is the GB chair of the International Ice Swimming Association, event director of the championships at Cheltenham and an accomplished ice and marathon swimmer. Kate is one swim away from becoming the first British person, and third person ever, to complete Ice Sevens – completing an ice mile swim in every continent – with just a swim in South America needed to complete what will be an incredible feat. She's swimming in memory of her son Dan.

After-drop is real – and how to deal with it

If you have spent any time hanging around open water swimmers you may have heard the term “after-drop”. If you’ve done any swimming in cool water, you may have experienced it. For the uninitiated, after-drop refers to the decline in your core body temperature after you have got out of the water.

When you swim in cool water the body cleverly tries to protect vital organs by reducing blood flow to the skin and limbs. Thus the core stays warm while the skin, arms and legs cool down. The process is known as peripheral vasoconstriction.

Cold water immersion: kill or cure?

Like other environmental constituents, such as pressure, heat and oxygen, cold water can be either good or bad, threat or treatment, depending on circumstance. Given the current increase in the popularly of open cold water swimming, it is timely to review the various human responses to cold water immersion (CWI) and consider the strength of the claims made for the effects of CWI. As a consequence, in this review we look at the history of CWI and examine CWI as a precursor to drowning, cardiac arrest and hypothermia. We also assess its role in prolonged survival underwater, extending exercise time in the heat and treating hyperthermic casualties. More recent uses, such as in the prevention of inflammation and treatment of inflammation‐related conditions, are also considered. It is concluded that the evidence base for the different claims made for CWI are varied, and although in most instances there seems to be a credible rationale for the benefits or otherwise of CWI, in some instances the supporting data remain at the level of anecdotal speculation. Clear directions and requirements for future research are indicated by this review.

Someposts on Nuala Moore's Arctic swims

Nuala Moore at the Albatross monument on Hornos Island, Chile celebrating her monumental swim. Cape Horn marks the northern boundary of the Drake Passage and marks where the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans meet.

Congratulations to Nuala.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Horn

Get high on your own supply

How to get high on your own supply:

  1. Get comfy - take a position most comfortable and safe to you (i.e. sitting or lying on the ground!). Ensure you can expand your lungs freely without any constriction.
  2. Breathe - Breathe in 30 power breaths. Pretend you're blowing up a balloon. Inhale through the nose/mouth, and exhale through the mouth in short but powerful bursts. Keep a steady pace, use your midriff fully, and close your eyes.
  3. Hold up - After 30 rapid successions, breathe in once more and fill the lungs to maximum capacity without force. Breathe out for as long as you can without force. Hold your breath until you experience the gasp reflex.
  4. Recover - Inhale to full capacity. Feel your chest expanding. When you're at full capacity, hold the breath for around 10 seconds - this indicates round one. The breathing exercise can be repeated 3 rounds after one another.
  5. Enjoy - After completing the breathing exercise, ensure you enjoy the feeling afterward. This feeling will increasingly be like meditation.

Good luck!

Jaimie Monahan Keeps Swimming On And On And On

n most sporting Halls of Fame, the inductees are retired athletes or luminaries in their chosen sport.

Among the honorees in the International Swimming Hall of Fame, many competitive swimmers still swim for health and occasionally compete in a masters swimming meets. For example, in 1977, 9-time Olympic champion Mark Spitz was inducted in the Hall of Fame, but he also tried to qualify for the 1992 Olympics at the age of 41 - in which he did not qualify for the U.S. Olympic Trials.

But the athletes and inductees in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame are

Murmansk, Russia Selected For IISA World Championship

The President and founder of the International Ice Swimming Association Ram Barkai announced Murmansk, Russia as the host city for the Ice Swimming World Championships 2019 on March 14th – 17th.

Swimmers from 30 countries are expected to be represented at the 2019 championships.

Reigning world record holders and world champions Hania Bakuniak from Poland (13 minute 5 second ice kilometer record-holder) and Petar Stoychev from Bulgaria (12 minute 15 second ice kilometer record-holder) are expected to take part.

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