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Meet the Irish Ice Swimmer Taking on Cape Horn in Togs

Selling bed linens in her little shop in Dingle by day and Ireland’s most accomplished ice and extreme swimmer by night, Nuala Moore is a force to be reckoned with.

Dingle’s Nuala Moore is a veteran ice swimmer. To mention just a few of her accomplishments: She is one of only six people to swim around the coast of Ireland in a 1,330km relay over 56 days. She then did a double-crossing Relay of the English Channel and swam the Bering Strait from Russia to the USA in some of the most dangerous waters in the world in a relay. She was the first Irish swimmer and the sixth woman in the world to complete a 1000 metre swim at 0 degrees in the Arctic Circle. Her latest challenge will see her head to the ‘end of the world‘ to swim in the waters where the Pacific Ocean meets the Atlantic Ocean. She will (if all goes to plan) follow this up with a solo double crossing of the Beagle Channel!

Swimming The Strait Of Gibraltar: From Europe To Africa

As I waited for my first Social Security check, I decided to push the envelope with swimming, a sport I had practiced for six decades. I read about the Gibraltar Crossing and realized that the idea of swimming from Spain to Morocco allayed my worries about turning 70. For me, when I am in the sea, all is well with the world.

It all started inauspiciously at the Bowman Gray pool, an ancient structure at the University of North Carolina. I was four and my swim teacher was squeezing my chest too tightly. Later that day, my mother yelled, “You bit his wrist like a damned dog. What a mean boy you are!”

International Swimming Hall of Fame Announces Induction Class of 2018 and Annual Awards

This year’s International Swimming Hall of Fame honorees include Open Water Swimmer: Petar Stoychev (BUL).

Pune man becomes first Asian to complete Ocean Seven Challenge

32-year-old finished the marathon by swimming across Cook Strait between the North and South Islands of New Zealand in 8 hours 37 minutes

The sea is as perilous as it is calm. And, no one knows that better than Rohan More who became the first Asian to swim across seven of the world's toughest ocean channels this month. On February 9, the 32-year-old resident of Senapati Bapat Road in Pune, swam across the Cook Strait between the North and South Island of New Zealand in 8 hours and 37 minutes. The Ocean Seven, a marathon-swimming challenge consisting of seven channel swims, is considered equivalent to the Seven Summits mountaineering challenge, that involves scaling the highest mountains on each of the seven continents. He is only the ninth person to complete it.

Argentina’s Biagioli and Bertola earn home wins in debut FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series race

Home fans at Coronda watching the first event of the International Swimming Federation (FINA) UltraMarathon Swim Series had everything to cheer for as Argentinians won both the men’s and women’s events.

But it was women’s winner Cecilia Biagioli who produced the performance of the day during this 57km - 35.4 miles - endurance race in the El Rio river as she finished second overall behind the men’s champion Guillermo Bertola.

Humanitarian Who Swam For Indonesia

Few foreign athletes have devoted themselves to humanitarian and environmental causes in Indonesia as much as Montgomery Monfore, an American world record ocean swimmer, who spent much of the past 20 years in Bali.

Monte, as he was known, made numerous record-breaking charity swims to raise awareness and funds for environmental and social campaigns in Indonesia. His untimely passing in October 2017 on Rota Island in the North Pacific Ocean was ruled accidental, though the autopsy report has led family and friends to question its veracity.

Crocodile of Nile Abdel Latif Abu Heif: A Forgotten legend

CAIRO – 30 January 2018: You might have heard about Farida Osman or Rania Elwani as the most famous Egyptians who wrote the history of swimming, but you may not know about the “Crocodile of the Nile.” A man who managed to dominate international open water swimming competitions in the 1950s and 1960s, winning around 20 major world competitions. His name is Abdel Latif Abu Heif.

Egypt Today celebrates Abu Heif’s birthday. Born on January 30, 1929 in Alexandria, Egypt to an athletic family; he was drawn to swimming even though the rest of them played table tennis. Abu Heif began a habit of winning trophies at a young age.

Junior doctor swimming Channel to help spine injury victims

WHAT’S it like to swim the English Channel? A Poole doctor who only started open water swimming last year will find out this summer.

Dr Annie Maggs, of Sherwood Avenue, will join a team of six raising money for the Aspire charity, which helps those with spinal cord injuries. She decided to take up the challenge during a year off following her foundation training.

“I wanted to do a personal challenge during this year and I got the idea after joining East Dorset Open Water Swimming Club,” she said. “Every week it seemed that someone had done a big event like swimming the channel so I thought I’d try that first of all as part of a relay.”

Diego Lopez Attempting ‘Continents Seven’ Open Water Swims in 2018

While most of us couldn’t dream of doing them all in even a lifetime, Diego Lopez is attempting a major swim in each of the seven continents in 2018.

Lopez, 36, was once a moderately successful pool swimmer growing up in the Canary Islands. He competed for London University while completing his masters degree from 2005-2006, but took the plunge into open water swimming when he moved to Hong Kong for work.

There, he joined the Open Water Swimmers of Hong Kong, a group which meets for weekly swims and offers instruction in open water strategy.

Extreme British swimmer reveals it was her autistic son begging 'Don't leave me, Mummy' that ended her epic 7 Oceans challenge and not a circling shark, toxic jellyfish or 20ft swells

  • Beth French aimed to complete the Ocean's 7 challenge in less than a year
  • It involves swimming across seven open-water crossings across the world
  • A film will be released this year to tell the story of 40-year-old Beth's challenge
  • British Beth is a self-employed massage therapist and mother to autistic Dylan

The warm waters of Hawaii’s Molokai Strait shone like silk in the moonlight. The 28-mile stretch between Oahu and Molokai islands, in the North Pacific, is notorious for its 20ft swells, strong currents and deadly marine life, but British swimmer Beth French deftly sliced a path through the swell.

Several hours into the 17-hour swim, one of the world’s most gruelling challenges for extreme swimmers, Beth did not immediately notice the dorsal fin surging upwards from the starlit sea.